Sweater arm bind-off question

CLABBERS's picture

I have been working diligently on a sweater for myself and I am to the point of binding off the 2x2 rib sleeve. The original pattern called for an i-cord bind off, but I wanted the more traditional rib simply because it hugs my wrist better. Which bind off would you guys use? Just a regular 2 x 2 rib bind off? Will that be stretchy enough. I like that bind off because it won't stretch out and get floppy. Judy's amazingly stretchy bind off is great for socks, but I am wondering if it might be too stretchy for a sleeve. Then there is the invisible 2 x 2 bind off which looks great, and it is stretchier than a regular 2 x 2 bind off and is indeed invisible, but it really is a fussy bind off and I am worried I will make egregious errors and really mess things up.

Any other options that you guys like? I am going to put the bind off on hold until I finish the second sleeve, and I may just force myself to learn the pesky invisible bind off.




SAPBrown's picture

the only "invisible bind-off" I have found is for a 1x1 rib.

I just found this:
but have not tried it yet.

Tubular bindoff is my favourite for binding off ribbing in sweater sleeves and necks.

Has a little give, and very minimal stretching out.

ronhuber's picture

Elizabeth Zimmermann's sewn bind off. Very neat looking and quite stretchy.

Thomasknits's picture

I second the sewn bind off and the "cast on cast off,"

and I also like the tubular, which you can do by moving the stitches via twist stitches or 1 over 1 cables to become 1X1 ribbing 1 row before the bind off, then do the usual tubular.


New York Built's picture

Posted here four years ago...still like it best.

For a double rib, beginning with K2;

Knit two, pass the first knit stitch over the second knit stitch. [Bring the yarn forward. *Transfer the stitch from the right needle to the left needle. Purl two together. Repeat from * once. Carry the yarn back. ** Knit one, pass the first stitch on the right needle over. Repeat from ** once.] Repeat between [] to the end of the row.

I know...very old school directions...but it harkens back to my Jacquard Loom days before computers. Yeah, I know...Eighteenth Century Old School...LOL. The purled two together part is the key, pulls those pesky knit stitches into obedience like the spring on a screen door...fettered, as it were.

Very smooth finish, like a smooth, cut edge, gently following the rib, but in a muscular way. Especially on a cuff for a man's sweater. I much prefer this more than the crochet-like edges on other bind offs...I save those for my Auntie-like antimacassars.

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Joe-in Wyoming's picture

I'd like to second this one...Mark told me about it when I was struggling with a very tricky ending for a top down sweater edge and this made the hemline look - and fit - exactly like I wanted and it looked quite sharp.

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CLABBERS's picture

Thanks for the insight, Mark! I like this one a lot and it's easy to do! I will continue to work on the other ones that were suggested here.


CLABBERS's picture

Wow...that's a lot to think about. I will be doing little swatches all day today. LOL I can always count on the guys on here to give great advice. Thanks!