Linen Stitch Scarf

Scarfs done in the linen stitch have been popular now for a while. Rather than being knitted back and forth across the width of the scarf these patterns are knitted along the scarf's length and in the round. The middle section is 20 plain knitted stitches and when finished you cut across the mid point of this section unravel and the braid the fringe . I am using four skeins of 100% Merino Wool by Koigu Wool Designs in Williamsfort, Ontario Canada in four color ways. I've included a picture of the sample in the store where the yarn was purchased. My son and his family live in Memphis and Yarniverse was a shop I easily found 2 blocks from the house they rented before they purchased their first home a few miles away. I vista the store every time I visit my son and always walk out with something.

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Comments

KenInMaine's picture

Cool! I've been wanting to try a linen stitch scarf for a while now. I'm excited to see how yours turns out and how your like making it!

TinkerJones's picture

I love the texture and the way the color variegations run the length of the scarf rather than across the width. I had attempted to do a linen stitch scarf for a friend but gave up after making some boo-boos and realized I couldn't really tell what I had done wrong... so I gave up and knit the scarf lengthwise using conventional knits and purls. I'll probably attempt it again someday with bigger yarn.

Joe-in Wyoming's picture

That is a nice scarf. By coincidence, I had a friend show me a similar sock yarn-based pattern last night, exclaiming, "Cast on 420 stitches, then knit lengthwise! My goodness!" All I could reply was that that was the usual way to knit the linen stitch scarf.

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JRob's picture

I cast on 480 and with the last 20 to be regular knit and 460 linen. Does take a while to complete a round. JRob

JRob's picture

I cast on 480 and with the last 20 to be regular knit and 460 linen. Does take a while to complete a round. JRob

Tallguy's picture

So you are, in fact, doing a steek. Yes, I've done scarves and shawls this way. While it seems to take a very long time to knit (and one round is a long row), remember you only have to do a much fewer rows, so it is completed a little faster this way. The yarns from the steek will create self-fringe, which you get normally in weaving, but are not natural in knitting.