Knitting Backwards

Has anybody experimented with knitting backwards?  Apparantly it's a technique that eliminates having to purl by keeping the right (knit ) side facing throughout and working backwards when at the end of the row by working off the right-hand needle onto the left.

 Apparently it's great when working patterns as the right side is always facing you.  I tried it once but it seemed very cumbersome and I've now forgotten how to do it.

I'd value any advice or instruction.

Simon

Topics: 

Happy New Year & many, many thanks to Darrel

Guys,
Since joining this site a few months ago I have been in contact with an amazing range of guys. Kind, helpful, resourseful & compassionate about our common craft-knitting.
Darrel without you, none of this would have been possible.
Thank you so much.
Looking forward to a great knitting year, 2006.
best to all,
Martin

Topics: 

Knitting Instruction & Reference Books

For the benefit of new knitters, I thought it would be useful to have a place here which lists those knitting books which we have found to be the most helpful to us.  I am confident this information would be very beneficial to those guys who visit our site and who are just learning, thinking about learning or returning to knitting.  There is an overwhelming number of knitting books available on today's market and a person could get lost in all of them.  I'd like to list under two catagories: The best instruction book and the best knitting reference book.

My favourite instruction book is "Knitting in Plain English" by Maggie Righetti.  Until I found this book, I was unable to figure out how to knit.  She is witty and explains things in an easy to comprehend fashion.  And, once I had done the "Dumb Baby Sweater" I found I had the confidence to jump right into knitting an adult jersey.

Topics: 

DPN's

As you can see in this pic, broken DPN's were salvaged to become VERY short needles to hold 3 or 4 stitches each while knitting the fingers on gloves. These short ones make it much easier to keep an eye from getting poked out, or getting long tips snagged elsewhere on the glove. Keeping them in the M&M candies tube means I don't have to rummage around trying to find them all. Besides, who sez all your needles gotta be the exact same length?

And yes, I did make all of these in the pic. The thin ones vertically on top of the wooden ones are actually pieces of metal coat hanger, clipped to size with pliers and points filed... they make nice US#1 size. Did I mention I'm a cheap S.O.B.?

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

Break a needle didya?

If you break a needle, whether plastic, wood or bamboo... DON"T throw it away. Those short pieces, when sharpened at both ends, become great little double-points for knitting the fingers on gloves. Then you'll be wrestling with a hedge-hog instead of a porcupine. I have had my share of experience with snapping needles in half, or even just the first two inches off the tip.

Since I'm a cheap S.O.B. I also came up with a cheap way to store my Lilliputian DPN's. Plastic M&M candy containers keep my short DPN's corralled, as well as straight pins, sewing needles, safety pins, and who knows when I may need a snack while knitting (melts in your mouth, not in your hand) that won't make a mess. I'll put a pic in the gallery and you'll get to see what I mean.

Topics: 

Tools

Some of the Straight needles I have made... pieces of craft store wooden dowels, cut to length, sharpened in a pencil sharpener, sanded smooth, with beads glued on. The smaller diameters on the right started out as bamboo skewers, sanded smooth, with beads glued on. All were rubbed with wax paper for a natural finish. As you can see, the needles on the left have craft store small spools for heads, all the others use beads from thrift store costume jewelry. I have been selling these, and giving them to people whom I have taught basic knitting.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: